Bumbles

Bumbles have different reputed origins, Irish Bumbles and Derbyshire Bumbles. The palmer style hackles suggest that they have an ancestry possibly earlier than the fifteenth century. Originally bumbles were fished wet. However F M Halford does recall using Bumble patterns on the river Test. The bumble is a great trout and grayling fly pattern.

About Irish Bumbles Fly Patterns

Irish Bumble patterns are traditional Irish Lough Patterns have proved themselves time and time again over the years, keeping the traditional Irish fly patterns alive and are excellent top dropper flies which can be used on most waters.

Fishing the Irish Bumble

Probably the most common way to fish a bumble fly is much the same as spidering techniques. It is to cast the Bumble across and slightly downstream, letting it sink and then swing in the current, rising with the tightening line much as a natural rises to the surface before hatching. It's on this rise that fish usually strike. Another productive method is to cast the fly upstream on a short cast and then let it dead-drift back to you just under the surface (or, if tied on a light-wire hook, in the surface film). On lakes and ponds a soft hackle fly cast in front of a cruising trout and then twitched slightly can be absolutely deadly. Many Irelfly anglers, especially Ireland , favor fishing two or three of these flies (of different colors and sizes) at a time.