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Seatrout and Trout Flies: 1

Sunday, 5 July 2015  |  Simon

To describe the seatrout as “fickle,” “mercurial,” or “unpredictable,” would be an understatement, and it is essential to choose your trout flies carefully when fishing for them. This shy, migratory version of the brown trout is rarely taken during the daylight hours. Anglers seeking to take them should be prepared to be nocturnal. Like bats, or other creatures of the night. Even in low water conditions the seatrout will run up rivers. One saying goes that “Seatrout will run on a fall of dew.” By contrast, salmon require a good spate to prompt them to make the journey from sea to spawning grounds. Seatrout come in two types: the large, solitary ones that make their journey early in the year; and the smaller school seatrout you will find in the summer, which sometimes run upriver in big shoals.

In general, seatrout have always been a puzzle. . .wrapped up in an enigma. Until recently they were thought to be a species unto themselves, with the scientific name salmo trutta, while brown trout are called salmo fario. In recent times, though, scientists have proven that the two fish are one and the same, and the term salmo trutta applies to both of them. One part of the mystery o trout is what prompts the brown trout of one river to migrate to the sea, while trout in nearby waters remain in the river. The theory that the availability of food supply in the rivers does not entirely answer the question.

We’ll say a little more about seatrout and trout flies in future blogs.

 
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